Barn Finds

TrueBlue02058

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Preserved Specimen: 1987 Ford Mustang GT Convertible

Jeff Lavery
Jeff Lavery


This 1987 Ford Mustang GT convertible wears perhaps the most iconic colors a Fox body can wear, with white paint accented by red trim and a corresponding interior. Despite its location in Canada, the seller notes this specimen has lived a sheltered existence and previously lived in California. The Mustang has under 80,000 original miles and lives in heated storage, presumably whenever the roads turn salty. The seller says there are no modifications and if the pictures are accurate, this is an incredibly nice example considering it still has nearly 80,000 miles. Find it here on eBay with a Buy-It-Now of $7,085 and the option to submit a best offer.

The interior really sets you back, as its both a striking combination and also in mint condition. I love cabins like this, as it was so clearly designed to be eye-popping with bright white leather, two-tone door panels, cardinal red carpeting and seat belts, and seemingly all done in such a way that it looks fantastic all tied together. While some of us may bemoan the automatic transmission, this car is such a nice cruiser that the manual almost seems pointless for a car you want to drive with as much care as possible. Even the plastic surfaces that tend to show lots of wear and tear look great here, such as around the steering column and shifter trim.

The engine bay shows no signs of modifications, with a familiar 5.0L V8 under the hood. The seller confirms this Mustang hasn’t been modified in any way, and that it recently passed its annual inspection. Tires and battery are new, but no other details are provided in terms of recent maintenance. Fortunately, these cars generally don’t have much in the way of needs when they’re as well-preserved as this example is, other than regular annual maintenance for the usual suspects like fluid changes, transmission flushes, and the like. More importantly, in my opinion, is the absence of rust.


The seller includes this photo of the iconic California sunset license plates that are included with the sale, along with the dealer plate frame from Swanson Ford in Los Gatos. I cannot figure out what the vanity plate translates to, so I’d welcome any readers deciphering this intriguing message. The seller will also include the original California title and sales literature. With such a gorgeous interior and rust-free exterior, it’s clear multiple owners have treated this Mustang GT convertible like the Sunday driver it deserves to be. The price seems super favorable to me, especially if you can negotiate a lower offer.
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More: Ford / Mustang
 

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Clean Canadian: 1948 Mercury M-68 Pickup

Adam Clarke
Adam Clarke


This 1948 Mercury M-68 is an impressively clean survivor that will grab plenty of attention wherever it goes. It is ready to be driven immediately, with the new owner needing to do nothing but enjoy the ownership experience. It has a known history, which should give anybody who is interested, some confidence that what they are buying is a healthy classic with the potential to provide many years of faithful service. You will find the Mercury located in Camas, Washington, and listed for sale here on Barn Finds Classifieds. The owner is asking $29,900 for this beautiful old pickup.

The M-68 is finished in a classic combination of Vermillion and Black. Including its current owner, the Mercury has only had two owners during its entire lifetime. The first owner had the vehicle repainted in its original color scheme around 15-years-ago, and apart from a few very minor chips, the paint is in good condition. That owner then used the vehicle for parades until such time as he passed away. The M-68 sat unused for some time before being purchased by its current owner. The Mercury’s working life was as a grain carrier, and a small “grain dump” has been cut into the tailgate. This is a neat and tidy modification, and it still functions perfectly. The timber in the bed appears to be nice and solid and has been painted to match the rest of the exterior’s shade of red. The next owner might choose to leave it as it is, although I wouldn’t be surprised if they chose to strip the timber and refinish it in a water-resistant clear urethane. The owner admits that this Mercury has a few faults, but none of these are particularly bad. The weatherstripping is functional, although it is tired. He suggests that replacing this would probably be a wise move. The glass also wears the sorts of marks and scratches that you might expect from a workhorse of this age, although none of it is cracked. The exterior trim and chrome are original, and while it isn’t perfect, its condition is perfectly acceptable for a daily driver.

Powering the Mercury is the venerable 239ci flathead V8, producing 100hp and 180 ft/lbs of torque. This power finds its way to the rear wheels via a 4-speed manual transmission with a “granny” first gear. The owner indicates that the engine has received a rebuild at some point in the past by Ford of Canada. When the current owner purchased the vehicle it hadn’t been running for some time, so he went through the process of returning it to sound mechanical health. This included replacing the distributor, plugs, plug wires, belts, and hoses. The radiator has also been replaced with an aftermarket aluminum unit, although the original radiator is in a box, and will be included in the sale. The owner identifies a small oil leak from the rear of the engine where it mates to the transmission, but otherwise, it sounds like everything else is fine. The M-68 doesn’t get a lot of use, with only the occasional jaunt around the block at around 30-35mph. He believes that this is probably the sort of speed that it would have seen when it was performing its grain-carrying duties, but if it is actually mechanically sound, then speeds above this on the open road shouldn’t present a huge challenge.


The interior of the Mercury remains just as presentable as the rest of the vehicle. There is wear on a few edges, the headliner has a slight sag, and there is a piece of trim missing near the ignition switch. It also appears that there is a piece missing from the radio blanking plate, and the kick panels are looking a bit dilapidated. Otherwise, it has a new rubber mat on the floor, while the cover on the seat also looks relatively new. It didn’t come fitted with a radio, but a correct radio is being included in the sale. It will be a matter of personal preference as to whether or not the next owner chooses to fit this. One really positive feature, especially given where the Mercury has spent the majority of its life, is a working heater. The owner states that everything else inside the pickup works as it should, and when you combine this with the apparent mechanical health of the M-68, it looks like it is a classic that is ready to be driven and enjoyed.

With the Mercury M-68 only being marketed in Canada, they are nowhere near as common on US roads as the equivalent Ford models. This one is a clean and tidy example that seems to offer ample opportunities for enjoyable motoring. It isn’t perfect, but it doesn’t appear as though it would take a lot of money or effort to take it to the next level. From a price perspective, it does seem to be competitive, because it isn’t that unusual to see these classics selling for $35,000 or more. For me, that would seem to make this a pickup that would justify a personal inspection if this type of vehicle is high on your wish list.



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More: M68 / Mercury
 

TrueBlue02058

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Lightweight Police Package: 1991 Ford Mustang SSP

Jeff Lavery
Jeff Lavery


This 1991 Ford Mustang SSP is a former Georgia State Patrol car that has never turned a wheel in civilian hands, according to the seller, who bought it as part of a package deal with another Georgia State Patrol Mustang and a Florida Highway Patrol SSP. Interestingly, it spent its active years on the vacation destination of Jekyll Island, Georgia, before being retired and living under carport after it was sold at auction in 1996. It retains many of its original pursuit features and faded paint, but it doesn’t run at the moment. The seller recommends a full reconditioning before attempting to start it for the first time, and it’s listed here on eBay with bidding just over $7K and no reserve.

The Mustang definitely looks rough around the edges, but it’s rare to find one these police package cars that’s still so original. The colors are still correct, with the contrasting gray paint on the roof, A and C pillars, and the trunk lid, but skipping the cowl panel below the windshield, which remains blue like the rest of the car. The lettering originally had “Georgia State Patrol” on both doors in all caps lettering, with “State Trooper” on both fenders. There was also originally a state seal on both doors. All of this has been removed, of course, but you can begin to see how easily this can be returned to original SSP specs with a decal kit and some paint work. The seller notes the original light bar wiring harness is still accessible behind the headliner.

The interior is in better condition than expected considering what the outside looks like, and also because former police cars tend to look pretty rough inside after years of hard use. The SSP is equipped with the more commonly seen automatic, but you could get a manual – however, most officers would likely agree it added an unnecessary layer of complexity for policing duties. The seller notes all sort of original details from police duty remain in place, including a mag light holding bracket, laptop stand, ground straps, and the original Lestek alternator, which is unfortunately locked up. The original blue coolant hoses were pilfered by the last owner, who used them for another project.


The Mustang does not run, but hopefully some basic reconditioning can bring it back to life. Other features worth noting include the factory undercoating that has kept the undersides nice and clean with no evidence of rust, and original holes for the police-issue antennas haven’t been filled in. This Mustang SSP is so close to returning to its original police-spec appearance that I have to imagine most potential buyers are looking at making this into an authentic recreation reflecting its days spent hunting down speeders. Of course, I have to wonder why a Mustang pursuit car was needed on an island resort community – other than, perhaps, the police officer who scored that post and the Mustang pursuit vehicle must have been very, very high up the food chain.
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More: Ford / Mustan
 

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Restore Or Restomod? 1970 Ford Mustang Mach 1

Adam Clarke
Adam Clarke


When it rolled off the production line in October of 1969, this 1970 Mustang Mach 1 would have been an attractive and fairly potent vehicle. The passing years have taken their toll on it, but it is by no means beyond salvation. For the right person, it could represent a great restoration project. If you think that you might be the right person, then you will find the Mustang located in Wylie, Texas, and listed for sale here on eBay. The owner has set a BIN of $18,600, but the option is available to make an offer.

Originally finished in Raven Black with White hood stripes, I believe that the Mustang has undergone at least a partial repaint at some point in its life. This is supported by the fact that it no longer sports those hood stripes. Looking through the photos reveals a very good reason why this may have happened. There is evidence of accident damage when you look through the comprehensive set of photos supplied by the owner. The Mach 1 has had a fairly decent sort of a hit in the front left corner, and if you look through the gallery of photos at the bottom of this article, you will find a photo taken of the engine bay showing that area of the vehicle quite clearly. Whoever performed the repairs didn’t do the work with anything resembling care and attention to detail. I don’t think that it would be possible to rectify the damage without cutting out that entire section and replacing it. This is a shame because being a Texas car, it has quite limited rust issues, and repairing the accident damage is going to add significantly to the workload. The panels look very clean, with little more than a few pinholes of rust. The trunk pan, drop-offs, and the rear rails look solid. The floors have some small areas of rust, and the next owner would need to choose whether to address these with patches, or go the whole hog and replace the floors entirely. The driver’s side torque box looks like it is okay, but it looks like there is some rust around the one on the passenger side. The condition of the external trim and chrome ranges between being good, and requiring restoration, while all of the tinted glass is present, and appears to be in nice order. The Magnum 500 wheels that are fitted to the Mach 1 are not original, as it originally wore Argent styled steel wheels. However, these wheels are dated correctly, so the new owner could potentially retain them if they wanted without disturbing the vehicle’s originality too much.

The blazing Texas sun is great for protecting the integrity of steel, but it can be absolute murder on plastic and vinyl trim. That is the case with the Mustang because the interior looks pretty awful. Everything in the way of trim and plastic is either baked, cracked, split or has had damage inflicted by its owners at some point in the past. The rear seat looks quite reasonable, but that’s about as far as the good news inside the Mustang extends. The rear trims have been cut to fit aftermarket speakers, and that’s a shame because they look like they might have restored fairly well. A full interior trim kit is going to be about the best approach here if the Mustang is going to be returned to its former glory. The Marti Report that is supplied with the car reveals that it originally featured an AM/FM stereo radio, but that is long gone. Otherwise, the Mustang also came equipped with a tilt wheel, while the factory air conditioning would have been a very welcome addition for anyone sitting inside this Black Mustang in Texas.


The Mach 1 was originally equipped with a 351-4V engine, and this would have pumped out 300 healthy ponies. This was backed by a 3-speed automatic transmission, with the Marti Report indicating that power steering and power front disc brakes were also part of the package. The owner says that at some point in the past, a previous owner pulled the 351 to perform a rebuild, and then proceeded to, er…lose the engine. Now that’s just plain careless! All that remains are the radiator and its shroud, along with the air cleaner, alternator, and a few sundry pullies and pieces in the trunk. If something resembling a faithful restoration is going to be performed, then the next owner is going to need to source another correct 351 to slot into the engine bay. Of course, they might potentially choose to abandon originality and use the Mustang as the basis for a resto-mod project. A more modern drivetrain and some sensible suspension upgrades could see this vehicle retain its classic appearance, while the driver could conceivably have access to significantly more than 300hp, with improved handling and braking into the bargain.

On the surface, this 1970 Mustang Mach 1 shows so much promise, but the visible accident damage is an inconvenience that might require some investigation. My main concern doesn’t revolve around the damage itself simply because the repairs don’t tend to indicate that the impact that the Mustang suffered was particularly hard, but the apparently rough nature of the repairs would make me want to take a closer look. If everything checks out okay, the existing repairs could potentially be given some finessing. Then, it could potentially be a pretty reasonable sort of restoration or rest-mod project because its rust problems seem to be so limited. It might not be perfect, but I think that this Mustang could be worth a personal inspection.



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More: Ford / Mach 1 / Mustan
 

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The Ultimate Mustang Barn Find? 1968 Shelby GT500 KR

Josh Mortensen
Josh Mortensen


When it comes to the world of barn finds, I’m sure there are more than a few people here that dream of finding a genuine Shelby Mustang parked in a barn. If you are in that category, this find by Reader Andy B will make you more than a little jealous! He had heard stories about what was parked inside this barn, but he hadn’t ever actually seen it. That was until his neighbor asked if he would be willing to help him either sell one of his cars or even buy it outright. When he went into the barn, he found a genuine 1968 Shelby GT500 KR! Could this be the ultimate barn find?


From Andy- Last week my neighbor asked if I wanted to buy his car or help him sell it. I have never seen the car but I have been hearing about it for a long time and as the story goes, it is pretty legendary. My neighbor isn’t much of a car guy but knows that I like cars, have a pretty respectable collection and have been through a few restorations, so he assumed I could at least point him in the right direction. The car is a 1968 Shelby GT500 KR and it was my neighbor’s uncle’s car. The title to the car was issued in 1970 but there is speculation that this car was purchased brand new. This is one piece of the story that we are missing. The Marti Report confirms that 8T02R is, in fact, a built-in 1968, Shelby 2-Door Fastback, 428-4V CJ V-8 Engine GT-500KR, Metuchen N.J., #2423 production, “I” Lime Gold Paint with Saddle Vinyl Luxury Bucket Seats, Tilt-Away Steering Wheel, 3.50 Traction-Lok Rear axle, and the 4-speed manual transmission.


Uncle Tom loved this car and drove it hard. There are plenty of stories of him terrorizing the local towns and would perform the $20 dollar bill challenge by putting the $20 on the dash and if the passenger could grab it before he hit fourth gear, you could have it. I guess he never was out any money. He even painted the inside of the wheel wells white and put green auxiliary lights in there to give the car a green glow. I found evidence of these aluminum “screws” that would screw into the front springs, jacking the front up. I never knew these existed. He completed the aggressive look by dropping the rear springs with the adjustable hanger bracket so that it could fit much larger rear tires mounted on Torq Thrust wheels. There is also evidence of attending car shows with various plaques adorned on the woodgrain dash along with a giant plaster snake that he would set on the roof at these shows.

In 1992, there was an exhaust manifold bolt broken, so Uncle Tom had removed the engine to get the block drilled out. While it was out, he went ahead and had the engine rebuilt. He had the car on a small car trailer in the yard so he could quickly get the engine back in just as soon as the rebuild was completed, but things took a turn for the worse. He got sick with kidney failure and he never made it see the engine finished. The car sat on the trailer in the yard for some time.

When Uncle Tom passed, he had no wife or children of his own, so he left his house to his niece, his truck and fishing boat to his nephew, and the KR to his other nephew, my neighbor. Now my neighbor may not be the gear head that the rest of us are, but he knew that this car was very special and he needed to be taken care of it. So the car went from the yard to the barn at Uncle Tom’s where it was expected to be safe for the time being. My neighbor was working his way through college and had no money to spare. He had made contact with the engine builder, gave him $500 toward the project and they agreed they would stay in touch and he would continue to give the builder money when he could. Well, life happens. My neighbor got caught up with life, bought a house, started a family, started his own business and proceeded to really make something of himself. He is a good friend, the best neighbor I have ever had; he even adopted a child, that’s evidence of his respectable character. Except the car was forgotten, or at least put on the way, way back burner.

Now it is time to resurrect the car from its 28-year hibernation in that barn, and this isn’t the typical barn find, fling the doors open and push the car out, that you might be expecting. We had 6 men moving various household items, tires, gardening supplies and trash for an entire morning before we could really even see the car. The barn is on the bank of a large river with a steep grade behind it. No sun seem to ever hit the barn and the door was jammed up for the last 28 years. Needless to say, everything was wet in the barn and the car did not appreciate this.

She is rough from sitting in the damp barn but at least it was up off the floor on the little car trailer, which might have helped some, but the rust has been aggressive. Torque boxes are blown out, there are perforations around the rear window, quarter panels are all the way through, rear bumper rotted through, all badging ruined, interior completely moldy, cracked and eaten by critters, wheels and possibly the rear end are locked up, and of course, no engine. Is this project savable? Anything can be saved for the right amount of money, right? To make it worth it, all the numbers better match which leads us back to the engine.

In 1992, a local fellow who was known to be a great engine builder decided to open his own shop. He was also just getting started and money was tight. Uncle Tom was one of his first customers with a project of drilling out a manifold bolt and rebuilding the legendary 428 Cobra Jet. The builder agreed to take on the project and got started on it right away. He broke it down, sent the block out to get it decked, bored, honed, all that fun stuff. He had quite a bit of money into it. Then Uncle Tom passed during all of this so the builder never really got paid.



I


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More: Ford / Mustang / Shelby




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TrueBlue02058

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1965 Ford Mustang 2+2 Fastback Project

Jamie Palmer
Jamie Palmer


Oh if only this 1965 Mustang fastback had been garaged its entire life the way it is now! Unfortunately, the purchaser of this car will have some rust to deal with instead. It’s listed for sale here on eBay and is (so far) less expensive than many similar Mustang fastbacks as bidding is still under $7,000 as I write. The pony car is currently located in Pawtucket, Rhode Island.

Thankfully, the seller does not try to hide the rust; there are several pictures that show some of the work that will be necessary on this car. I’ll admit, though, that it’s rare to see bumpers this rusty – it makes me wonder if they had been replaced with cheap reproductions at some point? The car has been stored since 1982 but we don’t know how well it was taken care of. The seller at one point calls it a “non-numbers matching” car as it has been converted from the original inline-six to a V-8. The seller thinks the transmission was changed out at the same time, and they also think V-8 suspension components were added at some point. I doubt that many of you would then go to the effort to return the car to its original configuration, especially considering the extent of the work you will have to do to return the car to the road.

So with originality out the window, what would you do with this early fastback? Restomod? Custom? Clone? GT350 copy? When one of these appears in white, I can’t help but envisioning it with blue stripes, but that’s me. Of course, I would make sure that anyone looking at the car knew it was not an original Shelby.


Look closely at this shot down into the right rear fender-well. It’s apparent that someone has already “repaired” this panel. Oh my. Given the extent of the rust here, I’m not sure if an acid bath or a Dynacorn shell is the best alternative.

The interior does appear largely complete if tatty. It will be useful having all the fasteners, clips and the like when the buyer puts this interior back together.

Can any sharp-eyed Barn Finds readers tell what V-8 this is? More importantly, have any of you restored a Mustang like this before? Share your experiences with the rest of our readers!
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More: Ford / Mustang
 

TrueBlue02058

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Unfinished Business: 1965 Cobra Kit Car

Jeff Lavery
Jeff Lavery


It’s not terribly uncommon to see unfinished kit cars show up on craigslist, often for less than what the seller has into the overall build. It’s understandable: many kit car manufacturers pump up the notion that you can do this in your own garage without too much effort, but the reality is life places demands on us that often conflict with our desire to build a Cobra replica with our bare hands. It’s a shame. But perhaps there’s someone out there with more time on their hands than the seller and can snatch this Cobra kit car up for a song. Find it here on craigslist in the Bay Area for $8,500.

Thanks to Barn Finds reader Pat F. for the find. The origins of the kit aren’t disclosed, and there’s usually some tell-tale sign that a kit hails from a particular designer. Kit car fans can likely talk all day about this topic at their annual convention, and what makes one kit rarer or more desirable than another. Some enthusiasts may look at this design and consider it inaccurate when compared to the original model, while others may see a sympathetic tribute vehicle. I can’t claim either side as my own from sitting here on my computer, but I’ll just say this: Cobra replicas look like tons of fun.

This particular kit comes with what looks like a fairly complete chassis, with most, if not all, running gear attached. The engine is a 351 paired to a C6 transmission, and the seller provides plenty of detail on the rest of the setup: the Cobra has a Mustang II front end with rack and pinion steering, as well as a 9″ rear end, front and rear bumpers, holes cut in the dash for gauges, and many spare parts. While the automatic is a matter of personal preference, the seller points out that the beauty of these kits is the range of drivetrains they accept, so you don’t have to stick with the path he chose to build this Cobra replica on.


There’s a few photos of some of the spare parts included with the sale, including the bumpers, dash fascia, and driver’s seat. I suspect there’s still much more needed to finish this Cobra kit off as a driver, such as basic luxuries like carpeting and windows. These are pretty big ticket components that the seller either doesn’t have them or never got around to tracking down. The listing seems to indicate the seller is very much open to offers, which is refreshing in this era of I know what I got pricing. Do you recognize the shop responsible for this particular kit car? Let us know in the comments below.
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More: AC Cobra / Kit Car
 

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Original Paint: 1977 Ford Bronco

Adam Clarke
Adam Clarke


It is pretty common to find 1st Generation Broncos where the steel has been cut to fit larger wheels and fender flares. That fate has not befallen this 1977 model, which is a clean and tidy example that is ready to be driven and enjoyed immediately. The seller has owned the vehicle for a few years, and since he doesn’t get to drive it that much these days, he has decided that it should go to a new home where it can be used and appreciated. The Bronco is located in Midland, Texas, and has been listed for sale here on eBay. At the time of writing the bidding has reached $23,200, and at that price, the reserve has been met.

With these older 4×4 vehicles, the very nature of the activities that they are designed to undertake can leave them wearing plenty of dings, dents, and scars. This is a vehicle that is an exception to that general rule, with the panels appearing to be nice and straight, while the Bright Dark Blue paint not only shines but has no visible significant scratches or scrapes. The owner indicates that the paint is original, but if it is, then it has survived exceptionally well. I’m not completely convinced by the claim, but I would be quite happy if I can be proven wrong. If it is original, then this is a vehicle that hasn’t lived a hard life by any means. When it comes to the question of rust, the owner does admit that there are two pieces of steel under the hood that have been replaced. While we can’t really see where these are, I would think that there is a good chance that these would be the sections where the inner fenders meet the firewall. This is an area that can find itself filled with compacted mud and gunk, and this is a great way for moisture to become trapped, leading to rust issues. There is also some rust present in the bottoms of both door shells, but this isn’t severe and could be addressed with patches. For me, probably the most important aspect of this particular Ford is the fact that no-one has seen fit to cut the original steel to fit bigger wheels and fender flares. If they had it wouldn’t have been the end of the world. This is a modification that can be reversed, but not having to think about it is a bonus for potential owners who are seeking originality.

With the mechanical configuration that this Bronco features, life in the middle of nowhere could potentially be pretty relaxed and fuss-free. Under the hood, we find a 302ci V8, which should produce around 133hp. This power finds its way through an automatic transmission and a dual-range transfer case to either two or all four wheels. In addition, the vehicle features power steering and power brakes to make those tight maneuvers effortless. Looking around the engine, there is some evidence that there has been some leaking or weeping of oil over time, but apart from that, it looks relatively clean. It does look like the vehicle has received at least a new booster and master cylinder recently, and while the owner doesn’t provide any information on how well the Bronco runs or drives, it does look like he might be very approachable if potential buyers need to make inquiries or want to organize an inspection.


The interior of the Bronco isn’t perfect, but it still looks very nice. The most obvious flaw is a seam separation on the passenger seat. It is a shame that this has been left to get so long, because the larger these get, the harder they are to repair. Still, I would be inclined to talk to an upholsterer before I considered replacing the covers because the ones on both the driver’s and the rear seat are in excellent condition. There really isn’t a lot more to be critical of inside the Ford, with the only obvious modification being a radio/cassette player fitted into the dash where the original radio should be. One interesting fact is that in the “Item Specifics” section of the listing, the owner does indicate that the Bronco comes equipped with air conditioning. However, I can see no signs of a compressor or any other hardware under the hood. Therefore, I suspect that this might be an error in the listing. I guess that this is a question for potential buyers to ask if they do approach the owner with a view to pursuing a possible purchase.

I quite like this 1977 Bronco, and I’m impressed by the vehicle’s overall originality. If you take a look at what is around in the market at present, the vast majority of examples do wear larger wheels and other modifications. Bidding to date hasn’t been quite as strong as I would have expected on a vehicle where the popularity is showing no signs of diminishing. Given this fact, if the Bronco does sell for a price somewhere around where the bidding now sits, it could potentially represent a very reasonable buy. The weather is improving and the great outdoors is beckoning. This could be a great way to experience the best that your country has to offer you.
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More: Bronco / Ford




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TrueBlue02058

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Original Paint: 1972 Ford F-250 Pickup

Adam Clarke
Adam Clarke


Original and unmolested classic pickups are highly sought, and the bidding on this 1972 Ford F-250 Sport Custom demonstrates this fact perfectly. This is a clean and tidy survivor, and with no rust to deal with, it is ready to get right to work for its next owner. Since it was listed for sale here on eBay, it has attracted an impressive 46 bids. The F-250 is located in Spokane, Washington, and that spirited bidding has pushed the price along to $12,000 in what is a No Reserve auction.

The Ford is a handsome looking vehicle that is finished in Royal Maroon. The paint is said to be original and is generally in above average condition for a commercial vehicle of this age. This is no trailer queen because the bed does show the sort of wear and tear that is part-and-parcel of a pickup that has worked for a living. Having said that, apart from a single dent on the right-hand wheel well, the bed really needs nothing more than a fresh coat of paint to have it presented at its best once again. Likewise, the paint has begun to wear through on the hood from cleaning and polishing, but it hasn’t reached the point where the metal is exposed. The next owner might choose to treat this area to a repaint, or it is equally possible that they might leave it untouched to maintain the vehicle’s character. The panels are as straight as an arrow, and the owner claims that the pickup is completely rust-free. The wheels are one area that is starting to show some age and damage to the finish. Because the rest of the F-250 presents so well, I would be very inclined to restore them, because they do detract from the appearance of the rest of the vehicle. The exterior trim and chrome also look pretty good, although the side molding that runs along the bed on the passenger side does have a couple of minor dings and marks. The glass all looks to be in good condition, with no sign of any significant chips or scratches. There are towing hitches mount on both ends of the pickup, and the one on the front can be a handy addition for the less confident person who needs to maneuver a trailer into a tight space.

For a vehicle whose primary role is as a workhorse, the interior of the F-250 presents in better than average condition. The floor is covered with a rubber mat that has avoided splits or tears, while the headliner is free of marks or sagging. The dash looks good, with no signs of damage to the plastic or the pad, while the same is also true of the door trims. It isn’t perfect, because there are some significant tears to the seat on the driver’s side and the wheel has some cracks along the spokes. The next owner might choose to replace the seat cover, although throwing a blanket over it would hide the problem. Similarly, the wheel could be replaced, but this could also represent an opportunity for the buyer to try their hand at steering wheel restoration. It looks like the shifter may have been replaced at some point because the column shroud for it is a mismatch. I guess that if the next owner does decide to restore the wheel, they could treat that to a repaint in the correct color at the same time.


For the 1972 model year, buyers were spoiled for choice when selecting exactly what engine they wanted to power their F-250. The original owner chose the 360ci V8, and that is what we find filling the engine bay today. This produces 185hp, which finds its way to the rear wheels via a 3-speed automatic transmission. This combination should be capable of towing some pretty hefty loads with ease, and the addition of power steering and power brakes means that the driver shouldn’t be prone to breaking into a sweat either. The owner says that the 360 kicks into life easily and that the Ford drives as well today as it would have when it was new. He does refer to it as a low-mileage vehicle, and the listing description mentions an odometer reading of 20,370 miles. I tend to treat that with a grain of salt unless the owner holds evidence to verify the claim. I am more inclined to believe that the odometer has rolled over, although I would be quite happy if he could prove me wrong on that point.

Finding a perfect 1972 Ford F-250 that is original and unmolested is a virtual impossibility today, and even tidy examples like this can be a rare treat. I quite like this vehicle, and would be equally comfortable with addressing its few minor issues, or just driving it as it currently stands. It would seem that I’m not the only one who feels this way, and that’s why the bidding has been so strong. Given the fact that this is a No Reserve listing, someone is about to score for themselves a clean and accomplished tow vehicle that is certain to stand out wherever it goes.
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Apr 19, 2020 • For Sale16 Comments
Original Hauler: 1955 Ford F-600
Scotty Gilbertson
Scotty Gilbertson


This opening image is almost like one of those photos that you see where someone is looking into a mirror with a mirror behind them and it goes on and on. It’s sort of unusual to see a roll-off or rollback truck on the back of another one, or it is for me, but how else do you haul a classic truck? This 1955 Ford F-600 heavy hauler can be found here on craigslist in Des Moines, Washington. The seller has reduced their asking price to $2,500.


This is such a great era for Ford trucks and the 1955 F-Series trucks would have been made during the second-generation, 1953-1956. It was when they changed the model name to F-600 from F-6. The F-600 is a 2.5-ton truck and it appears that this truck is from Washington state and was used for hauling metal, according to the faded paint on the doors.


There is some rust on the cab and that doesn’t count the hauling bed. Now that’s a rollback! Or a roll-bed, roll-back, roll-off, hyphen or no hyphen, etc. A few days ago, an experienced car guy and a long-time commenter was dismayed that I didn’t follow “writing standards” by referring to something by what he thought should be the standard name for it. So, what would you call this truck? The seller calls it a “rollback”, is that correct?

The seller refers to it as a “Brandon” winch but I think it may be a Bradon winch? Anyone? Whatever it is, it looks pretty rugged and when you’re hauling scrap metal, it needed to be tough. They say that the title is from 1977.

You already know that this truck needs work everywhere and with the only soft surfaces inside being the seat, it shouldn’t be too daunting to restore the interior. It looks like this truck was originally more of an olive green color – maybe Meadow Green? – that’s how I’d bring it back. This F-600 has a 4-speed manual transmission and a 2-speed rear end.

They say that the engine is original so it should be Ford’s slighter bigger 223 cubic-inch inline-six, the Mileage Maker. It would have had around 115 hp for 1954 and 1955. I expected to see a generator in this truck instead of an alternator. The seller doesn’t mention whether it turns over or not but let’s hope for the best. What would you call this truck, a rollback as the seller calls it? What would you use this truck for?
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Rare Mexican SUV: 1979 Ford B100 Three-Door

Jeff Lavery
Jeff Lavery


Another day, another oddball vintage SUV from Mexico? Actually, given this is the third Mexican-market SUV (D100, B100) we’ve featured over the last two weeks, perhaps “oddball” isn’t an accurate term. It does seem, however, some sellers have figured out there is a market for these full-size rigs that were never sold in North America and that the cost of driving them over the border into Texas is well worth the potential profits to be made by selling them state-side. This Ford B100 listed here on eBay has a later design corporate nose than the one we featured on April 8, and is listed with a Buy-It-Now of $9,950 or best offer.

The B100 looks identical out back to the one we featured earlier, which you can read about here. The nose design is obviously taken from a later-production Ford model, and I have to say, I like the newer F-Series / Bronco grill and headlight arrangement far better than the earlier style. It definitely makes the B100 look far more modern, and looks so much like a mass production model, I wouldn’t be surprised if it rolled right by me on the street before realizing what it was. The seller notes this example did incur some damage in shipping, which caused the tailights to “…disappear.” More details on the actual damage is needed, as it’s hard to tell exactly what needs repair.

I suspect the taiilights were stolen rather than disappeared, but regardless, that will be a problem the next owner will sort out (I’m sure they are standard-issue Ford lenses, however.) The interior features a four-speed manual, which is something you wouldn’t see in a modern-day Excursion or Suburban. The dash looks to be in fine condition, though it’s hard to see if the sun-drenched climate of Mexico has caused the dash pad to crack. Fake wood inserts in the dash still look respectable, and the bench seating shows no visible flaws. In fact, all three rows of seats look surprisingly fresh, and may have been redone in the recent past. The headliner also looks immaculate.


Fortunately, finding replacement engine components won’t prove too challenging given it’s just your bread-and-butter 302 under the hood. The seller notes the B100 does run and drive, but that it still is “…needing restoration.” That’s a perfectly vague description, and one that leaves a lot of room for possible interpretation in terms of the work needed. The paint looks surprisingly glossy, which could indicate a quicky respray, and given it’s already titled for road use in the U.S., there’s little doubt in my mind these limited-production SUVs are going to continue showing up for sale stateside as long as they can be purchased and flipped for a profit once over the border.
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2,970 Mile Police Interceptor: 2009 Ford Crown Vic

Jeff Lavery
Jeff Lavery


For years, former Police Interceptors – in most cases, known as the Ford Crown Victoria – have been popular buys on the auction circuit as cheap cars with some heavy duty factory upgrades (and of course, the added benefit of getting every vehicle on the road out of your way.) Of course, as former police cars, many of them are heavily used and cosmetically tired, but not this one: this 2009 Police Interceptor has just 2,970 original miles, indicating it somehow got lost in the motor pool and sat unused by a local police department. Find it here on the Big City Motors website with an asking price of $14,995 and located in South Dakota.

The paintwork is sharp, and surprisingly, it still looks every bit of a police car, sans department lettering on the doors. Of course, Police Interceptors weren’t just used by cops and detectives; everyone from the fire marshal to the dog catcher could have a black and white Crown Victoria at their disposal, depending on the municipality. Still, to find one that got the full police package treatment (and not just a solid color model that could otherwise be mistaken for a rental car) with lease-return miles is pretty incredible. All the other tell-tale signs are there, too, from spotlights to the trunk mount for additional antennas.

The interior is one of the first places it would become apparent you had just bought an old police car if you snagged one of these panther platform sedans at auction. Torn up seats, dinged up plastics, holes ripped from where communications equipment was ripped out, and God-only-knows-what on the back bench where criminals were kept. I don’t think you’ll have any of those problems here, as the interior looks to be in brand-new condition with no evidence of significant use. There’s an additional dome light mounted up front and other unused mounts for additional communications equipment.


Of course, under hood is spotless, and although the Police Interceptor upgrades weren’t immediately evident just by looking at the engine, they’re certainly there on a mint specimen like this. The 2004-2011 Interceptors were respectable performers, with 250 b.h.p. on tap and enhancements like a revised airbox shared with the Mercury Marauder; engine oil cooler; more aggressive shift points; and some even got a locking rear end. It’s a great option for a daily driver that will get nods of approval from both the muscle car crowd and Cars & Coffee attendees, especially given the museum-like condition on display here. If you want the best, the price seems fair to me.
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Worth Fixing? No Reserve 1965 Ford Mustang 289

Todd Fitch
Todd Fitch


Like Rodney Dangerfield, the Mustang coupe, the non-fastback, gets little respect. The aftermarket actually sells a conversion kit that makes your coupe into the more popular Sportsroof body. Still, some people prefer them; the coupe is lighter and more structurally sound than a Sportsroof, making it popular in vintage racing. They are cheaper to buy, their trunk keeps your belonging out of site, and the more vertical rear window shades the hot sun. This 1965 Ford Mustang in Ronkonkoma, New York looks amazingly original, right down to the hub caps! The combination of a 289 cid V8 and three-speed would have been a modest upgrade over the base inline six-cylinder engine. Despite being parked since 2001, the little Ford’s engine turns and shows clean oil, according to the seller. The carb is stuck, though, and no attempt was made to start it. The listing here on eBay includes more pictures and details including descriptions of probable rust repairs. At least five bidders have elevated the value of this forgotten Ford beyond $750.


My friend Randy owns a nearly identical Mustang, a Wimbledon White ’65 coupe, 289, but with an automatic and a lighter interior. Randy’s car is also amazingly stock, down to the hub caps, some hoses, clamps, and paint. Expect some heartbreak when you investigate the rear window frames. The seller reports rust in numerous lower regions as well.


For a cruiser, the 289 gives you a satisfying V8 sound and enough power to feel snappy. The three-speed manual adds more fun to the mix. The pervasive surface rust suggests storage either outdoors or on a natural surface. Moisture gets trapped under the hood and goes to work on everything.

The interior looks great compared to many we’ve seen! The radio is either stock or uses the stock opening. I’m not sure I’d replace much here, though a thorough inspection is advised before throwing a party about it. Regardless of this car’s destiny –stock or modified, minimal or full restoration– let’s hope whoever buys it puts it on the road as soon as possible. Another two decades of neglect and outdoor storage and this one will waste away. How would you treat this little white coupe?
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No Reserve: Low-Mile 1970 Ford Mustang Mach 1

Adam Clarke
Adam Clarke


One thing that has not changed in the time that I have been writing for Barn Finds is just how amazed that I am by some of the really nice classic cars that continue to emerge from hibernation in barns, sheds, and garages. That car owners could hide some of these machines away for years, and in some cases, decades really does boggle the mind. That is the case with this 1970 Mustang Mach 1. This is a true classic that has spent years hidden away in a garage. Why? There is a story behind each of these cars, and while sometimes an owner is forthcoming about just why the car was parked, some keep that secret to themselves. The latter is the case with this Mustang because while we know that it had been parked for years, it isn’t clear why it was parked. It has been dragged out into the light of day and returned to a running and driving state. It now needs someone to finish the process, and to then get out on the open roads to enjoy a true classic. You will find the Mach 1 located in Woodstock, Connecticut, and listed for sale here on eBay. Bidding has reached, $21,550, and what makes this an even more attractive prospect is the fact that it is being offered for sale with No Reserve.

The Mustang is finished in Acapulco Blue with a Black hood stripe. With no Marti Report or access to the trim tag, it isn’t clear whether this is the original combination. What also isn’t clear is what state the underside of the vehicle is in. We don’t get any photos of the vehicle’s frame or the floors, and the owner doesn’t mention any issues with rust. Looking around the outside of the vehicle, there is nothing readily visible. One really positive aspect of the listing is that the owner would appear to be quite approachable, so it might be possible to contact him and clarify a few points. The Mustang’s panels look nice and straight, and while the paint has a number of scratches and is a bit thin in places, it still remains quite presentable. The trim and chrome seem to be in nice condition, with no obvious problems or issues. The majority of the glass looks good, but the windshield is cracked. The Mach 1 wears a set of Magnum 500 wheels and judging by the condition of both the wheels and the tires, I suspect that they have been a fairly recent addition to the car.

The engine in the Mustang is a numbers-matching unit, and it looks like it is the 351-4V, which produces 300hp. Backing this is a 4-speed manual transmission, but that isn’t original. The vehicle also features power steering and power front disc brakes. The owner states that since it was removed from storage, the Mustang has had plenty of time, effort, and money spent on it to return it to a running and driving state. The general appearance of the engine suggests that it may have been pulled to at least undergo some detailing, although it is possible that the work goes a bit deeper than that. The engine is fitted with a new alternator, a new Edelbrock carburetor, and at least a new starter solenoid. It may also wear a new starter, but the owner doesn’t mention this. The fuel hoses and filter look like they are new, and with all of these fuel system components now replaced, the fact that he also chose to replace the fuel tank was a pretty wise move. The master cylinder looks like it is new, but there are no indications as to whether any other brake components have been replaced. For all of this work, there are a few things that I find a bit odd. The engine itself presents nicely, but the air cleaner has a really rough appearance to it. Similarly, the distributor cap is quite dirty, and some of the plug wires have been replaced, while some haven’t. The wires also look like they might have been “cobbled together” from somewhere because many of them are miles too long for this purpose. The owner says that there are still some tasks to be tackled, and it is possible that these are some of the things that he is thinking of. The Mustang now runs and drives, which will at least give the next owner a point from which to work.


One of the cheapest parts of a 1st Generation Mustang to restore is the interior because parts are so plentiful and usually quite affordable. The interior of this car isn’t really going to need a lot of work, because it is in respectable condition. What we can see of the dash and pad looks quite good, while the white upholstery on the seats and door trims also looks nice. The original radio has been replaced with a radio/cassette player, but I don’t think that the dash has been cut to fit this. There are three items that will need replacement if the interior is to be returned to its best. The first of these is the carpet, because in some locations, particularly under the driver’s feet, it is showing some significant wear. The headliner is also stained and has some obvious tears, so a new one will be required. Those parts are cheap, but the other item comes under the heading of fairly expensive. The rim-blow wheel is badly cracked and split, and I believe that it is beyond restoration. New replacements are available, but at more than $700, they aren’t cheap. It isn’t something that would need to be replaced immediately, but sooner rather than later would be a good approach. Before I forked out $700, I would be perusing eBay and Craigslist for a while, because you might just strike gold on one of those sites without spending anywhere near that sort of money.

It will be interesting to see just how high bidding finally goes on this 1970 Mustang Mach 1 because on the surface, it doesn’t look like a bad buy. There are a few aspects of the car that would need to be clarified, including the state of the vehicle’s underside, along with what further work would be required to return the vehicle to a roadworthy state. With the owner appearing to be quite approachable, it is possible that he will be willing to provide honest answers to any queries. Anyway, it costs nothing to ask, ad it could be well worth the effort.
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More: Ford / Mach 1 / Mustang




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C-Code Driver: 1966 Ford Mustang Coupe

Jim Motavalli


There’s probably a business in helping people post craigslist ads because here’s an example where the seller—with a really nice car—does almost everything wrong. The automobile in question is a 1966 Ford Mustang Coupe with desirable 289 V-8, for sale here on craigslist in Sacramento, California with an asking price of $8,700.


The problem is very bad photography that doesn’t begin to do a fairly tidy car justice. The photos were vertical—who does that?—and have been cropped by me into uneasy horizontals. There’s only one very bad shot of the Mustang’s exterior, but it looks like the two-tone original copper-and-black paint is holding up fairly well, albeit with some rust in the fender bottoms and along the rocker panels. The chrome is also good, from what we can see. All the trim is in place, as are the distinctive hubcaps.


The owner states that the C-code automatic Mustang has matching numbers, a rebuilt engine, and runs excellently. It’s a California car, though that rust came from somewhere. The owner claims to have “lots of maintenance receipts.”

That’s about it for information. No word on the brakes or other systems, though we do learn the car has helpful power steering. The front seats have their original upholstery, with splits, under cheap covers. The back seat appears pristine. The dashboard appears intact, with even the original radio in place, and there’s a nice floor shifter.

To sum up, it’s a sought-after car, in decent condition but requiring an easy restoration that could be undertaken with the car still on the road. Anyone seriously planning to risk $8,700 will want to see more pictures, especially to try and document the extent of the rust.

Anyone can see that this baby has possibilities. Well, maybe you can’t actually see it, but you can imagine it. It sure helps that the car is running and driving, not just hauled out of wet storage. What do you think?
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50k Mile Survivor: 1979 Ford Bronco Ranger XLT

Adam Clarke
Adam Clarke


If Ford ever had any doubts that it was making the right move by introducing a 2nd Generation Bronco in 1978, then they only needed to look at the sales figures to realize that they had backed a real winner. In 1978, Bronco sales had easily exceeded the previous 4-years of the older generation…combined. The 1979 model year brought even greater success, and our feature Bronco Ranger XLT comes from that banner year. It has belonged to the same family since new and is in exceptional condition for its age. The Bronco is located in West Linn, Oregon, and has been listed for sale here on eBay. Strong bidding has pushed the price along to $25,000, but the reserve hasn’t been met.



The Bronco is a stunning looking vehicle, and there is no doubt that it would attract plenty of attention wherever it goes. It has belonged to the same family since new, and it recently underwent a repaint in its original Raven Black. The owner goes to some pain to emphasize that this repaint was performed to the highest standards and that there is no Bondo or rust anywhere in the vehicle. They supply an impressive selection of photos in their listing (you will find a small sample below), and these show that the underside of the vehicle appears to be very solid and very clean. There is so much to like about the vehicle, and the incredible gloss of the paint is nicely complemented by chrome that looks to be clean and free of any significant flaws. The lift-off fiberglass top also seems to be in good order, while the glass, including the power rear window, appears to be free of noticeable chips or scratches.

The Bronco’s interior has its good and its bad points, but for me, the good most definitely outweighs the bad. Tackling the negatives first, the cover on the top of the dash does hide a multitude of sins…or more accurately, cracks. The vehicle has spent the majority of its life in California, and while that climate might be renowned for being beneficial when it comes to the long-term preservation of steel in classic vehicles, it can exact a heavy toll on plastic. The dash pad has multiple cracks, and I believe that these are beyond repair. Replacement would seem to be the best long-term option, but in the short term, the cover should keep things looking tidy. The carpet, especially in the front, is starting to look tired and worn. Still, it is the original carpet in a 41-year-old 4×4, so it would probably be unrealistic to expect it to be perfect. It is serviceable as it is, but given how nicely the rest of the interior presents, it would be very tempting to replace it. Speaking of nice presentation, the upholstery on the seats, the door trims, and the headliner, all look to be in very impressive condition. There is little to be seen in the way of faults, and the next owner would be able to take the vehicle anywhere with their head held high. The Ranger has been fitted with an AM/FM radio/cassette player, while the air conditioning has recently been upgraded to R134 refrigerant, and is said to blow ice cold.


The primary purpose of the Bronco is to allow its occupants to get out into the wilderness in style, ease, and comfort. With this in mind, this vehicle comes equipped with a 402ci V8 engine that produces 156hp, a C6 automatic transmission that sends power to either two or all four wheels via a dual-range transfer case, along with power steering and power brakes. The owner claims that the Ford has covered a genuine 50,000 miles, and while it isn’t crystal clear in the listing, it does appear as though he may well have evidence to verify the claim. He does say that the vehicle has been properly maintained and that not only does the transmission shift smoothly, but that the Bronco does drive nicely. It also features many recently fitted new items, including tires, a battery, and an exhaust.

In a 12-year production run, Ford managed to sell 225,585 examples of the 1st Generation Bronco. The 2nd Generation only remained in production for 2-years, and in that time, Ford sold 181,955 vehicles. That it was a sales success was no doubt, and given the fact that Ford had managed to develop it by utilizing a significant number of components from the F-100 pickup, this meant that the Bronco was developed and produced for relative peanuts…in automotive terms. The very nature of their designed purpose means that the vast majority of Broncos of this age have led pretty hard lives, and are either full of dings and dents or riddled with rust. This example has avoided this fate, and when you look the whole vehicle over, it’s easy to see why the bidding has been so strong.




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Tropic Yellow Survivor: 1988 Ford Mustang LX

Jeff Lavery
Jeff Lavery


This 1988 Ford Mustang LX coupe checks more than a few boxes in terms of being a desirable specimen of a Fox body. First, it’s an LX car with the 5.0L V8 paired to a five-speed manual transmission. Next, it has just 39K miles from new – and looks the part. Finally, it wears one of the rarer colors to find a Fox body in, a very pretty shade of paint known as Tropic Yellow. Put it all together and it’s a near-perfect specimen of a Fox platform Mustang – if only it were a notchback, every one of my boxes would be checked. Find the survivor ‘Stang here on craigslist with a price of $12,000 firm. Thanks to Barn Finds reader Pat L. for the find.

I don’t blame the seller for holding firm on that number, as Tropic Yellow Mustangs don’t come up for grabs every day. It’d be a $10K car just for being a low mileage example with the preferred combo of a manual transmission and the V8, but throw in the color and the stock condition and it’s easy to see why the seller isn’t interested in flinching. The Mustang will come with two sets of wheels, the other being the chromed Pony wheels that are a tad overdone, in my opinion. The stock LX wheels with white-letter tires if the perfect look for a Mustang of this generation. Note that the trim with the subtle red stripe looks like new.

The clean condition carries over to the cabin, where the light tan upholstery shows no signs of soiling or extensive wear. Even though 40,000 miles can seem low, plenty of cars look like trash after that amount of use. This Mustang is claimed to be in the hands of the original owner with all necessary documentation to prove that the mileage is genuine. A/C is still said to blow cold and the heat works as intended, and the seller says all other controls work as they should. While a GT may have come with the better seats and the body kit, there’s something pure about an LX with its no-bolster buckets and clean body lines, free of any plastic add-ons.


Don’t get me wrong – I’d take a GT in a heartbeat if it were in condition like this. The LX has always had a slight sleeper vibe to it, especially if you delete the 5.0L badges from the fenders. Of course, you don’t want to distort anything on an example like this that has survived in the hands of a clearly very careful owner. The engine bay presents well with zero signs of modifications – not even a K&N filter. While we sometimes recoil at seller who list their price as being firm, the ask here seems reasonable for the condition on display and I doubt you’ll ever lose a dime on the initial investment. If you know a Tropic Yellow notchback for sale, please get in touch!
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Brand New 1977 Triumph Bonneville 750!

Montana Danford
Montana Danford


This really nice looking 1977 Triumph Bonneville hasn’t been restored. In fact, it is brand new and is a Silver Jubilee edition 750 with only two miles on the odometer (which the seller describes as “push miles”). It spent its life at a dealership in the Northeast and is now located in a private collection in South Carolina. It can be found for sale here on eBay with a current bid of over $10,000. Aside from one small ding on the gas tank, this is an amazing survivor! Have a look at this brand new 43-year-old bike.


According to classic-british-motorcycles.com, the “Silver Jubilee” edition of the Bonneville 750 was created to celebrate the 25th anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II’s coronation. The bikes were officially called the T140LE Bonneville Silver Jubilee Edition but were essentially T140’s that had cosmetic differences. As you can see, this one says “One of a Thousand” which means it was part of the initial 1,000-unit run. The bike was so popular that Triumph ended up making an additional 1,400 which were mostly made for the U.S. market and were marked as “Limited Edition.” If you have any questions about the authenticity, the seller also has the original Manufacturer’s Statement of Origin documentation.


The power plant for the Jubilee edition was the same as the standard 750 Bonneville but it featured chromed primary, timing, and gearbox covers. It is an air-cooled over-head-valve vertical twin measuring 744cc with a 5-speed constant-mesh clutch with a left-foot shifter. According to Classic-British-Motorcycles.com, the only real mechanical enhancement to the bike was the addition of Girling’s new “Upside-Down Shocks” with exposed springs.

As part of the cosmetic enhancements, the Silver Jubilee was given a special blue over silver paint job with red stripes and yellow pinstriping. The seat was upholstered in dark blue vinyl with red piping and the color combination was meant to pay homage to the British flag. As you can see, the only blemish on this bike is a small ding on the gas tank.

One of these bikes sold at Mecum Las Vegas 2019 and brought a winning bid of $11,000 with the buyer’s premium included. I’m guessing that one was probably restored so I don’t know how that would impact the value compared to this one. Overall, it seems like a nice collector to hold on to. What do you think?
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One Owner Widow Maker: 1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV

Jeff Lavery
Jeff Lavery


When it comes to performance cars and bikes, anything nicknamed “Widow Maker” should get your attention. Two vehicles that immediately come to mind: the turobocharged Porsche 930, and the Kawasaki H2 750 Mark IV. These bikes were part of an arms race of sorts where power came first and handling capabilities were an afterthought. Many of major bike manufacturers wanted to take the crown as the builder of the baddest, most brutal sport bike available, and Kawasaki delivered with the H2. This one is a claimed original owner example with numbers matching drivetrain and original paint. Find it here on eBay with no reserve and bids to $7,500 at the moment.

Journalists at the time had their pick of 750 superbikes available from the likes of Norton and Ducati, but Kawasaki had yet to enter the ring. The company had set the benchmark earlier with the high-performance H1, but at 500cc, it was becoming old hat in this new era of superbike performance. Once again, Kawasaki stepped up with the introduction of the H2, which featured 74 b.h.p. and weighed around 450 pounds. That power-to-weight ratio resulted in blistering performance, and while it was a monster in the hands of a capable driver, it was a dangerous appliance for less skilled riders – hence the nickname.

This example apparently had an owner that was either a capable operator or simply too scared to ever open it up to its full potential. Nothing wrong with that, especially if the bike proved intimidating once in their garage. The seller highlights the original condition, which is particularly significant in light of how many of these were likely damaged or wrecked when new. The tank is said to be in good shape and has been cleaned out as the bike was sitting prior to the seller acquiring it. The tank does have a small dent which he has confirmed can be removed with paintless dent removal. The seat will also likely need some upholstery work.



The seller states that the engine does have compression and turns freely. If I’m reading the description correctly, the seller acquired it as a project that had been sitting, but he has gotten no further than cleaning out the tank and the bike has continued to stay parked. The good news here is you’re starting with a very clean, unmolested baseline and original paint is a rarity on bikes of this age. Throw in the fact that the seller has confirmed just one longtime owner before himself and you likely have a specimen that rarely turns up with that kind of provenance. If you know how to ride, it’s an awesome choice for a vintage bike with the stones to keep up with modern traffic.
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