Barn Finds

TrueBlue02058

Post King
Original K code! 1964 Ford Fairlane Sports Coupe

Todd Fitch
Todd Fitch


Drag racers rarely come with their original engine block, but this one does! Buy this 1964 Ford Fairlane Sports Coupe in Islip Terrace, New York and you’ll get what remains from the car’s tenure as a eighth-mile contender. Do you like short gears? How about a set of 5.43s installed and two sets of 5.67s? That will get you merged into traffic on the on-ramp. The listing here on eBay expires soon and, while bidding has topped $10,000, that’s not enough to meet the seller’s Reserve, which is probably nearer to the Buy It Now price of $15,000.


The Fairlane Sports Coupe was Ford’s closest thing to the then-upcoming Mustang, and a number of early Mustang parts transfer to the mid-sized Ford. Tipping the scales under 2900 lb makes the sprightly two-door lighter than a Fox-body hatchback, and equally responsive to weight reduction and additional power.


Ford stuffed 427 cubic inches (7.0L) of fury into the compact Fairlane with its fearsome Thunderbolts, but for the eighth-mile, this car’s small block and killer gears would have scared nearly any passenger. A K-code Fairlane could make a fine road-racer as well. Hot Rod Magazine said the solid-lifter “K Code” 289 cid (4.7L) V8 packed the “heart of a Shelby,” with 271 high-revving HP. Only 600-some examples were built, and this is one.

Extrapolating from the racer’s trick of mounting the tachometer with the redline straight up, the last combination in this Ford must have been good for 7500 RPM. Extra parts coming with the sale include two extra engines, scatter shields, three cams, and more. With no engine or interior pictures, the listing may struggle to bring top dollar. Despite its rarity I’d be tempted to put this two-door back in straight-line form and have some fun, postponing a true restoration for the future. How would you treat this angry-looking Windsor-block Ford?

More: Ford
 

TrueBlue02058

Post King
EXCLUSIVE: 1967 Ford Mustang Survivor!

Jeff Lavery
Jeff Lavery


This pretty 1967 Ford Mustang was purchased by the seller to use as a classic cruiser, with its ideal blend of steady six-cylinder power, excellent colors, and documented history among two previous owners from the same family. The Mustang is unexpectedly up for sale as the seller has set his sights on a track car project and space and cash are needed. The Mustang comes with its original Protect-O-Plate and virtually no rust, even on the frame rails – damn impressive for an Ohio vehicle. The asking price is $14,250 and mileage is noted as 57,119.


The irony for me about six-cylinder Mustangs is the most recent models tend to catch flack from enthusiasts, being labeled hair stylist’s cars and want not. But then when you realize how few vintage six-cylinder models remain in condition like this one, it dawns on you that not nearly as many people are preserving and restoring these things as there are highly preserved Mach 1s and other V8 models. And look, I get it, everyone wants a screamer, but there’s a ton of enjoyment to be gleaned from a classic coupe that’s just a great cruiser. This one fits the bill, with excellent paint and a body that shows no evidence of major cosmetic flaws. Wire hubcaps and mudflaps complete the cruiser look.


The interior looks like a very nice place to spend time, with clean carpets, un-ripped upholstery, and a beautiful dash. The aftermarket radio is a distraction, but it’s not currently hooked up and could be an easy swap back to a more period correct unit. The interior colors are noted as light ivory gold which contrasts nicely with the dark moss green exterior. I love the simplicity in Mustang interiors of this era, with no console going down the middle floor – just your shifter assembly, two buckets, and the road in front of you. The seller notes the gas gauge isn’t working, which occurred after the old fuel was drained out of the tank.

The engine bay appears quite clean and neat, and while some may be disappointed to not see a big, honkin’ V8 under the hood, that would defeat the purpose of a car that’s this well-preserved. This Mustang should be enjoyed at a light simmer, not a full boil, and as an added bonus, look at all that space to work in! The seller has addressed a few helpful maintenance items, including a recent tune-up, refreshed brakes including repacked bearings, and the carburetor has been rebuilt. Likely due to it being sold new in a region with a winter season, the Mustang is equipped with the cold weather intake in which the water pumps through the base of the carburetor then into the heater core.

The underbody shots really tell the story here, as the Mustang looks impressively clean for a non-restored car. The gallery photos below show a variety of different angles of the frame rails and underbody shots, and there’s not even any significant surface rust to note. My daily driver is 44 years newer and has way more surface rust on the suspension components than this Mustang does. While the Mach 1s and 289s will always thrill, this classic six-cylinder cruiser is sure to spark plenty of enjoyment – so leave comments or questions below for the seller if you would like to learn more.
  • Asking Price: $14,250
  • Location: Elyria, OH
  • Mileage: 57,119
  • Title Status: Clean
 

TrueBlue02058

Post King
AAA Service Vehicle: 1973 Ford Bronco

Jeff Lavery
Jeff Lavery


How cool is this thing? This rusty 1973 Ford Bronco was a loyal service vehicle for two gas stations for decades, being sent out on distress calls on behalf of AAA members. The Bronco, like small, square-body SUVs of almost every configuration, seem to have a tendency to end up as the gas station beaters for any number of hard-work tasks. Bringing this Bronco back will be a labor of love, but doesn’t it deserve it? Find it here on eBay with bids just over $4K.

The Bronco is located in Delaware, not exactly ground zero for rust-belt cars and trucks, but certainly not immune to the perils of winter and road salt. The Bronco is described as a desirable, uncut example, but it has plenty of rust in the body and frame to make inexperienced restorers think twice before bidding. The nose panel actually doesn’t look too bad, and I’m not surprised at all to see a giant push bar on the front – perfect for bucking stranded motorists out of a snow bank.

The seller says the drivetrain is one of the highlights, with the 302 V8 running and sounding strong. It’s paired to a C4 automatic transmission and has power steering. The seller further notes it is equipped with front drum brakes and a nine-inch rear, and that the manual locking hubs you see in pictures are not included (shame, those are a nice upgrade – but cheap to source and install). A replacement shift collar has been installed, but further re-assembly is required.


Woof – here’s where you can see where the next owner will have their work cut out for them. The body is, indeed, rusty, with evidence of prior failed attempts to stop it from spreading. We haven’t even seen the frame yet, but this isn’t good. While I love the patina and hope those doors never get painted (the seller feels they can be saved), this rusty Bronco does raise the question as to whether it’s better to wait for a less rusty example, albeit without the cool AAA connection.

More: Ford
 

TrueBlue02058

Post King
25,486 Original Miles: 1987 Buick Grand National

Jeff Lavery
Jeff Lavery


This 1987 Buick Grand National is a documented, 25,486 mile example that has been in storage since 2010 following the previous owner’s passing. The seller is a family friend who purchased the car from the deceased’s wife, and he notes that despite obviously needing the full assortment of tasks associated with reviving a long-dead car, this Grand National is a surprisingly solid example under all that grime. Find it here on eBay in a no-reserve auction with bids to $10K.

The Grand National started life in California before moving to Tennessee with its first and only owner prior to the seller coming into possession of it. The seller notes the bottom of the car is incredibly solid, which you can attribute to the California climate and also to the storage building the GN was stored in – it appears to have concrete floors, a sure-fire way to help keep the bottom intact. Note the troublesome bumper covers at both ends are missing.

Inside, the cabin is in need of a good cleaning, but does appear to be reflective of a low-mile example. The seats just look too clean for this car to be faking its claimed limited road use, and I find fabric is such a tell-tale sign as to whether a car has more miles on it than advertised. I’ll bet the interior would really pop with a proper detailing. Cars like this Grand National, effectively a low-mileage driver-quality example, don’t pop up too often, especially in no-reserve auctions.


By the way, thanks to Barn Finds reader Patrick S. for the find. The seller notes that the Buick fired up with a new battery and starting fluid, and that the car sounded good. Not much else has been done by way of analysis, but the seller isn’t advertising it as anything other than a low-mileage Grand National he dragged out of storage. The low-mileage and one owner history make this Grand National a very tempting project, and one that will likely appreciate nicely.

More: Buick




SHARE
 

TrueBlue02058

Post King
Old School Racer.

Storied Vintage Racer! 1929 Ford Roadster

Todd Fitch
Todd Fitch


Vintage racing cars stimulate sensations and conversations that today’s 500+ HP techno-beasts can never approach. For every advance that adds comfort and safety to the driving experience, more visceral qualities of fast driving fade into history. This 1929 Ford roadster in Three Bridges, New Jersey brings the new owner instant credibility in the vintage racing scene, having factored into Leon Sells’ place in the Georgia Racing Hall of Fame, and more recently gracing the cover of OL’ Skool Rodz magazine’s May 2019 edition. Bidding here on eBay has topped $8500 without meeting the seller’s reserve. Thanks to reader Ikey H. for spotting this unique slice of racing history.

Tires play a role in your overall gearing package, and tall tires resist wheelspin. Traction Control used to come from lifting your right foot. Skill was required, and not everyone was equally good at it. Consequently, the faster car didn’t always win, and going fast drew praise for car *and* driver, not simply the faster car. Who can identify those bullet tail lights in the comments below?

Race cars evolve continually. This Ford’s high-speed heritage began in 1952 and this tricked-out ’53 flathead pays tribute to that era. Rebuilt parts including brakes keep this roadster in good working order and it “runs great” according to the seller.


The industrial-looking dashboard provides the driver with a no-nonsense array of data and controls. What looks like a ’40 Ford steering wheel controls direction.

The ’29 Ford rear suspension calls to mind the truck-arm suspension of modern day NASCAR. It’s hard to put a price on a machine like this, but I’d suggest something more than $9000. Don’t buy a car like this for a lawn ornament, and definitely pass if you consider “Blind Spot Detection” a must-have feature. Cars like this were exciting *because* they could kill you, in 100 different ways, something that’s even more true in today’s world where cars automatically brake, steer, and limit power to curtail what would have been fatal mistakes when this car circled the dirt in anger. What would you pay to take a spin in this old school roadster?

More: Ford
 

TrueBlue02058

Post King
Definitely Cool, but for it's asking price You could get a new gas powered A Class Motor home with warranty.

Swiss Hockey Team Bus: 1961 Mercedes 0321H

Jeff Lavery
Jeff Lavery


This vintage Mercedes-Benz 0321H bus is a rare sight here in the U.S., especially as a fully-equipped motorcoach that hasn’t been languishing in a forgotten backyard and occupied by chickens. These high-zoot buses occasionally pop up for sale and always look like they got there by accident; this one was purchased from Europe and imported a few years ago, and has been traded among collector circles ever since. It formerly served as the team bus for a Swiss second-tier National League hockey team. Find it here on eBay for $124,900.

While I realize buses are hard to characterize as beautiful or graceful, this example is full of art-deco inspired styling cues that make it downright handsome. The small details were not overlooked here, from the slight bumperettes to the skylights in the roof to the handles on the engine lid – everything looks far more graceful and artistic than you’d ever expect a bus to be. While I’m sure the price tag was higher than a contemporary U.S. model bus, I’d gladly pay for these qualities in a mass-people mover.

The driver’s seat was far from spartan, with little chrome details around the gauges and controls, and a steering wheel that’d look just as at home in a Mercedes 190SL roadster. A surprisingly conventional shifter assembly sticks out of the floor, giving off the feeling that anyone could hop in and drive this Mercedes bus tomorrow. The vehicle didn’t always look this nice, however, and it was converted to a proper R/V within the last few years, which helps explain why things still look so good inside.


The seller notes that the bus has received some modest re-conditioning in the time it has been in the United States. Some of the major services include a new diesel primer pump, six new tires, new ignition switch, differential fluid change, various brake services, and more. The cabin features six beds, cooking areas, bathroom, and hanging cabinets. This is a great alternative to the typical R/V conversions roaming the U.S., and a clear ancestor to the modern Sprinter conversions that are so popular today.

More: Mercedes-Benz
 

TrueBlue02058

Post King
55K Mile Split Window! 1963 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe

Jim ODonnell


Split window! There, I got your attention. There are “trigger” words, depending on your preferred marque, that get car people revved up and split-window works for the Corvette faithful. That being the case, let’s take a closer look at a 1963 Chevrolet Corvette “split window” coupe, located in Billings, Montana and for sale here on craigslist for $109,950. Thanks to Pat L for the tip!


The story of the ’63 split-window Corvette is pretty well known as it was a struggle between engineering and styling. Styling won the contest in ’63 but engineering got a leg up in ’64 and the C2 defining split window was no more. I have never driven a ’63 split-window model but I am told that the shortcoming was rearward visibility. Well, I have driven innumerable late model cars with their built-in bunker aesthetic and if I can deal with one of those, I’d be comfortable with the split window design of the ’63 Vette, if for nothing else, the iconic styling which is the payback for the diminished rearview.


Corvettes of this era were known for power (mostly) and the seller of this ’63 tells us that this ‘Vette is equipped with a 327 CI, 340 HP engine. One of the unique features of this 327 engine is the solid lifter valve train which requires occasional valve adjustments but does dole out power excellently in the upper RPM range without valve float. And this is where I am surfacing my first concern. My memory, as well as research, tells me that this engine should be equipped with a Winters Foundry aluminum intake manifold and cast aluminum valve covers, two readily identifiable items that are clearly absent, though the air cleaner looks correct for a 340 HP engine. The typical ignition shielding is missing too so there are some cautionary items to consider. The seller does state that the numbers match, and that’s encouraging, but are they a match for a 340 HP engine or one of a lesser nature? As always, I welcome comments on this item from our notably informed readership. There is no reference to the transmission other than to state it is a manual which is all that was available with the 340 HP engine. While a three-speed manual was standard with a four-speed as an option, and I can’t make out the shift pattern diagram on the console, I’ll assume this is a four-speed. The three-speed manual is pretty rare, amounting to only about 4.3 % of total ’63 production. There is no confirmation given as to how this Corvette runs other than the toss-away line of, “gone through again front to back to ensure years of pleasurable driving/showing.” I don’t know exactly what “gone through” is supposed to mean but I found one instance in the case of a car that I bought were “gone through” meant checking the oil level. At this price point, I would want specific details.

No comments on the interior but the black leather-grained vinyl and carpet looks great. This Corvette is a 55,000-mile example so the interior is in keeping with the expectation for that kind of low mileage. The cheesy aftermarket radio is a real detraction but, thankfully, the seller states that he has the original and it is included in the sale.

Body panel fit and the Daytona Blue finish on this ’63 looks strong! No mention if the finish is original but I know from experience that Daytona Blue had a real tendency to oxidize when left outdoors in sunlight for an extended time frame. Supposedly this car was in storage for 30 years so that would mitigate damage to the finish but there would be other attendant things to consider on a vehicle that has been sitting so long. Hopefully, that’s what “gone through” translates into.

Well, this ‘Vette looks sharp, no doubt about it! While I love the split-window design, I prefer the ’64 hood without the fake chrome vents. I think I would have also gone for something other than white-letter tires too. The seller does mention that he has the stock bias-ply tires, wheels and wheel covers if originality is important to you. I like the aluminum wheels but could do without the “spinners” unless they do the same thing that James Bond’s DB5 could do – all subjective on my part of course; it’s all about what you prefer. If I were really interested in this Corvette, I would have to either head to Billings for a total inspection or hire a knowledgeable agent to handle the task for me. This is just too much scratch, in my mind, to make any kind of a commitment on a car, sight unseen. How about you, how would you handle this potential acquisition if you were interested?

More: Chevrolet Corvette
 

TrueBlue02058

Post King
V8 5-Speed: 1993 Ford Mustang LX

Adam Clarke
Adam Clarke


While many people believe that the Mustang II perfectly encapsulated the Malaise Era of American motoring, the ongoing development of the subsequent Fox-body Mustang showed that Ford had once again found its muse in the pony car sector. By 1993, the Mustang was a car that was able to demonstrate a decent turn of speed, and this Mustang LX hails from that final year of production. It is located in Saint Petersburg, Florida, and has been listed for sale here on eBay. With bidding now sitting at $8,200, the reserve has been met.

The Vibrant White Mustang presents incredibly well, especially considering that it still wears all of its original paint. It’s pretty hard to find anything to be critical of with the car’s panels and paint, and given the light paint color, the fact that the leading edge of the hood and the front bumper seem to have largely escaped issues with stone-chips is a real bonus. The fact that the vehicle has been garage-kept for its entire life will certainly have helped to keep it in such nice condition. The Mustang is fitted with tinted glass, and this appears to be faultless. If I am going to find anything to be critical of, it is the fact that both of the front wheels look like they might have suffered some staining from exposure to brake dust over the years. This is quite common, and it can be rectified to return the exterior presentation to pristine. This is purely personal preference, but if you were to place two identically equipped Mustangs side-by-side, with one being a hatchback and the other a notchback, I’d take the hatchback every time. To me, they just look that bit better styled, and definitely more purposeful.

The Mustang features a Black interior, and once again, this is completely original and unmolested. The condition is first-rate, and it really doesn’t look as though anyone has ever sat in the rear seat. The cloth upholstery is showing no signs of fading, while the vinyl and plastic trim is free of cracks and discoloring. As well as all of the standard appointments such as a driver’s airbag, console, power mirrors, a leather-wrapped wheel, and power lumbar supports on the front seats, the original owner certainly loaded the Mustang up with some nice options. The next owner will find themselves with air conditioning, power windows and locks, a premium AM/FM radio/CD player, and cruise control.


There were a couple of engine options open to prospective buyers who wanted to slap down the cash for a ’93 Mustang LX, but there is no doubt that the 5.0-liter “HO” V8 was the pick of the bunch. That is what you will find under the hood of this car. Making it all the more desirable is the fact that it also comes fitted with a 5-speed manual transmission, a 3.08 Traction-Lok rear end, power steering, and power front disc brakes. The car is said to run and drive perfectly, with smooth operation for both the clutch and transmission. The owner states that the car has covered a genuine 77,000 miles, but there is no mention as to whether he holds any proof to verify this. However, given the fact that the car comes with all its original documentation, including the Window Sticker and a Marti Report, I wouldn’t be at all surprised if he does hold verifying documentation for the mileage.

Production of the Fox-body Mustang continued well past the time that Ford had envisaged. It was slated to be phased-out by 1988, but a strong public response saw the car soldier on until 1993. By that point in time, Ford had started to fully embrace emerging technology in fuel-injection and electronic engine management, and the Mustang was once again a car that was capable of delivering respectable levels of performance. While the LX version has not become a big-dollar car, it is a car that has continued to steadily increase in value in recent years. Really nice examples are definitely capable of fetching prices in excess of $15,000, so if this particular car sells at or below that sum, then it would appear that the new owner will have bagged themselves a pretty good buy…especially when you consider that this car cost the original owner more than $17,000 way back in 1993.






More: Ford / foxbody mustang
 

TrueBlue02058

Post King
Most Expensive Muscle Car Ever? 1968 Ford “Bullitt” Mustang

Montana Danford
Montana Danford


This car really needs no introduction. For those of you who haven’t seen the famous 1968 movie Bullitt, the title character, played by Steve McQueen, drives this Highland Green 1968 Ford Mustang GT throughout the movie. Some would argue the 10-minute car chase featuring McQueen’s Mustang and a black Dodge Charger is the most iconic movie car chase ever. There were two cars used to film the chase sequence, VIN ending in 558 for the jumps and 559 for close-ups. Designated by filmmakers as the “Hero Car,” this car was used for the majority of the chase scenes and has been in private hands since filming wrapped. It has fully-documented provenance detailing its ownership and has been analyzed by the experts at Hagerty who “…moved the car to our HVA National Lab in Allentown, Pennsylvania so that every aspect of the 559 Mustang could be exhaustively photographed and the body 3-D scanned.” The car is now one of only 26 vehicles on the National Historic Vehicle Register. Owned by one family since 1974, it was re-introduced to the public at the Detroit Auto Show in 2018. In April of that year, the car was exhibited in the HVA’s glass display box on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as a tribute to McQueen. The car is now being offered for sale with no reserve at the January 2020 Mecum auction in Kissimmee, Florida where it could go down in the record books as the highest-priced American muscle car ever sold at auction!


The car has been modified for filming and it still retains most of those modifications today. There are metal tubes welded under the rockers for camera mounts along with holes cut into the trunk to allow cords to run from the generator to the cameras and lights. After filming wrapped, the car was sold to Warner Brothers employee who used it as a commuter for a short time. It then passed through the hands of a New Jersey Detective and eventually to the current owner’s family in 1974. The purchase price back then? Six thousand dollars! Even Steve McQueen himself tried to purchase the car and was turned down. You can read more about the history of the car and check out more photos here on Mecum’s website and here on Hagerty.com.


Mecum president and founder Dana Mecum says he expects the car to surpass the American muscle car auction record that was set at their 2014 Seattle event where a 1971 Plymouth Hemi Cuda convertible sold for $3.5M! As for the other Mustang used for filming, we featured (what is believed to be) it here on Barn Finds in 2017 where it was found in Mexico after being wrecked during filming. So, how high will the bidding go on this car? There are skeptics who think it won’t even pass the current Mustang auction record of $2.2M. There’s also speculation that someone like Jay Leno or the Petersen Automotive Museum may purchase it. What do you think? Is this the most valuable muscle car ever?

More: Bullitt / Ford Mustang
 

TrueBlue02058

Post King
Worth Restoring? 1965 Ford Mustang

Adam Clarke
Adam Clarke


While I have always harbored the belief that no car is beyond help given enough time and money, sometimes even I have to draw that line in the sand and admit defeat. This 1965 Mustang is a case in point because it has been sitting in its current location since 1970. Probably its strongest attributes are the fact that it still has its tags, and it does come with a clean title. Located in Mansfield, Ohio, the Mustang is listed for sale here on eBay. It also probably rates as one of the cheapest Mustangs that we have ever seen here at Barn Finds, with bidding having reached $355 in a No Reserve auction.

Some project cars are cheap because the owner simply wants to move them on to a new home, and some are cheap because the amount of work required to breathe new life into them is the automotive equivalent of scaling Mount Everest…on your hands and knees. This Mustang definitely falls into the latter category. When you open the trunk and find the rear springs and the remains of the rear frame rails poking up through where the floor used to be, then you know that you have problems. It would probably be easier to list the components that don’t have rust issues, so it’s a good thing that glass can’t rust. The windshield is scrap, but the remaining tinted glass looks quite good. The trunk lid looks like it might be okay, and the passenger side door also looks like it might be able to be salvaged. Beyond that, there are a few external trim pieces that could be saved, but the rest of it looks like it’s toast.

When the Mustang was capable of moving under its own power, it did so utilizing a C-Code 289ci V8. The owner believes that the manual transmission might be a 4-speed, while the car is also fitted with what he refers to as a Posi rear end. The condition of the drive-train is probably quite questionable because the car has been sitting out in the weather with no hood for a very long time. With the air cleaner open as it is, it’s a fair bet that more than a little water has managed to find its way inside that sweet little 289. I would be extremely surprised if the engine turns freely, or if it is locked, whether it could be unlocked. Of course, the transmission and rear end might be able to be salvaged, but I suspect that those would be about the only items worthy of consideration.


The fact that the interior is complete is about as far as we go with good news inside the Mustang. With the windshield sporting a substantial hole, the elements have done their worst to the upholstery. It’s also worth considering that water will have found its way into the switches, relays, electrical connectors, and the inside of the gauges. There are a few minor items here that could potentially be salvaged or restored, such as seat frames, but I suspect that the next stop for most of it is going to be the nearest rubbish skip.

When it rolled off the production line finished in Vintage Burgundy with a White interior, this Mustang would have been considered to be a pretty stunning and desirable car. Time and the elements have done it no favors, and it is now a shadow of its former self. There is little doubt that its future rests as a donor car, and if that is its ultimate fate, then it will be a sad end for a true American classic.

More: Ford / Mustang
 

TrueBlue02058

Post King
34k-Mile Pace Car: 1979 Ford Mustang Turbo

Bruce Johnson
Bruce Johnson


Update 12/3/19 – This Pace Car has been relisted here on eBay with no reserve! It should be interesting to see how close it gets to the seller’s original asking price.
From 10/19/19 – This iconic 1979 Mustang is for sale in Katy, Texas, just outside of Houston. It is for sale here on eBay with an asking price of $22,398.92. That’s right, the Buy it Now price is to the penny! Of course, the seller will consider offers for this Indy 500 Pace Car. Being an all original low mileage car that looks to be in really nice shape, that price might not be unrealistic.


Production of the Indy 500 Pace Car edition totaled 10,478 cars in 1979. The special interior included Recaro seats covered in houndstooth fabric. A buyer could choose between a 3-speed automatic or a 4-speed manual transmission. The 4th gear of the manual transmission featured overdrive gearing.


A buyer also had two engine options. The 5.0-liter V8 or a 2.3-liter turbo 4-cylinder engine were available in the Pace Car edition. Most Pace Cars were ordered with the 2.3-liter turbo engine. The Indy 500 Pace Cars for 1979 were loaded with multiple options including the TRX suspension. These are fun cars to drive, especially with the TRX suspension.

The 2.3-liter turbo engine produced 131 hp and 142 ft-lbs of torque. In addition to low mileage, this survivor has a moonroof and appears to have lived a pampered life. With Fox-body values on the rise, what do you think this one will sell for?

More: Ford / Mustang
 

TrueBlue02058

Post King
Super Clean And Loaded: 1977 Mercury Cougar XR-7

Todd Fitch
Todd Fitch


Full-sized cars of the ’70s rarely get much attention, but this 1977 Mercury Cougar XR-7 in Bellbrook, Ohio demands a second look for multiple reasons. First, it’s got beautiful paint; look at the shine on this barn-find beauty! Second, it’s loaded; unless my eyes deceive me, it’s got air conditioning, power seats, power windows, and cruise control… at least! Lastly, the listing here on craigslist.org asks only $2,000.


The carpeting has seen better days, but otherwise there’s not much to complain about in this all-important shot of the driver’s seat. Buyers will want more interior pictures, but the back seat’s in great shape too. Hailing from an era where buckskin and green hues assaulted the eyes, this Mercury’s two-tone upholstery proves pleasant to behold, and compliments the attractive exterior. This choice appears to have been part of a Decor Group that year.


After enlargement from the Mustang platform (’67-’73) to the Torino platform (’74-’76), Mercury’s Cougar hit the “big” time in 1977 as that marque’s version of Ford’s Thunderbird personal luxury coupe. Fans of the original Cougar (and T-bird for that matter) likely view this generation as abandoning the cars’ roots. Still, consider how fans of bands like The Rolling Stones and Rush have largely embraced musical change and remained loyal across musical generations. Similarly, Mercury Cougar followers may simply appreciate that the decades of change delivered a Cougar for everyone, and this generation can be celebrated for being the largest examples of a well-kept cat. Thanks to wikipedia.org for some details.

With fewer than 94,000 miles on the clock, this XR-7 probably needs some maintenance, but should have plenty of its nine lives left. With the biggest available 400 cid engine under the hood, this Cougar should perform well as-is, though imagine the fun you could have with a 350+ HP rebuild! Forget the original XR-7’s road-racing inspiration. Most owners of this generation XR-7 can corner all year without knocking the Kleenex box off their package shelf. This XR-7 mixes a heavy dose of luxury with its sport, including a special better-handling suspension and other features. I’m tempted to buy this one myself! Who’s got $2000 for this fine specimen?

More: Mercury
 

TrueBlue02058

Post King
25th Anniversary Car: 1989 Ford Mustang

Jeff Lavery
Jeff Lavery


This 1989 Ford Mustang GT is a 25th Anniversary edition model with under 40,000 original miles. These special editions featured some cosmetic enhancements in recognition of the model’s 25th birthday, but were otherwise standard-issue GT-spec. This example remains unmodified from new and has had some big-ticket maintenance items addressed recently. The seller notes the reason for the sale is due to a bad knee, which prevents the use of a manual transmission. Find it here on eBay with bids just under $12K and no reserve.

To me, this is the epitome of the 80s Mustang: hatchback body, rear spoiler, polished Pony wheels, and the full GT bodykit. Mind you, I like my Fox Bodies must plainer, in LX 5.0 notchback form, but I can appreciate what a proper Mustang GT should look like. The fact that this one has somehow escaped being modified – even with an aftermarket exhaust – is commendable, and the seller has done a nice job of keeping this one a respectable driver. He notes it draws a crowd at any show he attends.

The interior is in great shape, and I’m grateful to see the preferred manual gearbox inside. The 25th Anniversary cars were not over-loaded with special features, with a simple badge on the dash that denoted it was a 25th Anniversary model the only indication from the cabin that you were driving a tribute to the Mustang’s silver anniversary. The bucket seats are clean, and the door panels show no signs of aftermarket speaker installations gone wrong. The carpets look quite clean, as well.


Under the hood, a stock 5.0L V8 resides and benefits from recent repairs performed at the seller’s local Ford dealer. These include: a new steering rack, hoses and fittings; upper and lower intake gaskets; valve cover gaskets; PCV valve and filter; gas filter; oil change; and front end alignment. For a car that was likely already pretty buttoned up, these repairs should ensure years of trouble-free driving for the next owner. While I wouldn’t buy this car because it’s a 25th Anniversary model, I would buy it because it’s a super-clean Fox Body GT.

More: Ford / Mustang
 

TrueBlue02058

Post King
Sinatra’s 1965 Ford Thunderbird!

Jay B
Jay B


Here at Barn Finds, we’ve previously written about cars claimed to have been owned at one time or another by famous people. Some with documented provenance, some without. The seller of this ’65 Thunderbird for sale here on eBay declares the car was purchased by “Ol’ Blue Eyes” himself, Frank Sinatra, for his daughter, Nancy. The seller hasn’t been able to verify his claim but provides a registration certificate with the last name”Sinatra” written on it (mysteriously, the first name on the certificate is unreadable). The car is offered at the BIN price of $5,999 and is located in Roy, Washington, where, according to the seller, local people know all about its history. You’re not convinced? Well, then let’s do some sleuthing!
According to the seller, he bought the T-Bird from a guy who bought it at an estate sale who was told the car had been bought by Frank for Nancy. Whew! But wait, there’s even more “proof!” A friend of the seller who is a police officer confirmed the story and told him the car was bought by the late crooner, so it must be true! Too much sarcasm on my part? The seller has attempted to verify the authenticity of the car’s Sinatra ownership but claims he’s been unable to contact Nancy. But have no fear as I may have a solution to that problem. There is a link here on Nancy Sinatra’s website where fans are invited to “talk to Nancy.” Who knows, if contacted perhaps she’d take the time to confirm or deny the seller’s story? Does anyone want to take a stab at it?

The aforementioned registration certificate shows a transfer of ownership in 1967 from someone with the last name of Sinatra whose address was in Los Angeles, California to a person in Puyallup, Washington. If the car was, in fact, Nancy’s, she didn’t hold on to it for very long. The seller claims someone spray-canned the exterior with red primer before he purchased it in 2004. A Marti Report is included with the sale which documents the car’s original Midnight Turquoise paint. Judging by the photos, the interior appears authentic although a replacement carpet and headliner are needed.


The original Ford V8 390 is mated to an automatic transmission and, according to the seller, will start “with a little effort and move under its own power.” That sounds a bit vague coming from someone who’s owned the car for 15 years. As is often the case with old cars, someone absconded with the original air cleaner assembly. That isn’t necessarily a big deal but if I were looking to purchase this T-Bird I’d find it annoying. Most will argue the possibility this Thunderbird was purchased by Frank Sinatra for his daughter, Nancy, adds absolutely no value to the car whatsoever, and I’d have to agree. The fact is it’s a “basically straight” but rusty restoration project that’s likely been sitting on a used car lot in Washington for 15 years. The Sinatra story (along with the 37 exclamation marks (!) used by the seller in the eBay ad) is simply a sales gimmick. Nevertheless, what do you value this ’65 T-Bird coupe at?

More: Ford
 

TrueBlue02058

Post King
No Reserve: 1994 Dodge Viper RT/10

Jeff Lavery
Jeff Lavery


This 1994 Dodge Viper is listed for sale at no reserve, but the seller does include a price in the description of $34,900. Regardless of what it sells for, these early Vipers are relative supercar bargains if you can handle the crudeness of the chassis, as the performance is staggering for what you spend. Not to mention they don’t exactly require Ferrari-levels of upkeep, making them a bit easier to live with day-to-day. Find this 26,166 mile example here on eBay with bids currently at $20,255.

The seller notes this is the best color combination Viper out there, featuring a black exterior and hardtop over gray leather. That’s debatable – personally, I love them in yellow over a gray interior – but it is a looker no matter how you slice it. These earliest Vipers represent an interesting stopgap in terms of automotive styling, as they blend some early 90s cues like the slicer wheels with the pending migration to sharper edges and angles that are all the rage today. I was just amazed as how much they made the nose look like an actual snake.

The interior is in nice shape, and the gray leather is a handsome combo. I drove one of these in GTS coupe-spec a few years ago and couldn’t get over how uncomfortable the driving position was. The pedal box basically shoves your feet over to the left of where they normally would be while your body stays in the same place it would in any other car. Visibility is near non-existent and you live in fear of scorching your leg on the door sill that covers the side-exit exhaust. Yes, it’s fun, but also a handful. Not a great car for a novice, in my opinion.


The seller doesn’t offer too many details on the mechanical health of the Viper, but one would hope the low mileage would keep any major issues to a minimum. The listing says the Viper features an “automatic” transmission, which is clearly a typo and not exactly confidence-inspiring, as I don’t believe a slushbox was even an option in ’94. Regardless, the Viper – like its fellow 90s supercar the NSX – has been cheap for a long time, and likely won’t be for much longer as GenXers start snatching them up to drive to the next Radwood show.

More: Dodge
 

TrueBlue02058

Post King
Running Flathead: 1950 Ford F-47 Pickup

Adam Clarke
Adam Clarke


The “F-47” badges that this 1950 Ford Pickup wears signify that this is a vehicle that wasn’t produced in the USA but rolled off Ford’s production line in Canada. It is identical to the American F1 Pickup in every way except for those badges. This is a solid old Pickup, and it seems to be ripe for restoration. If you ever needed an indication of just how desirable these classic pickups are, you only need to check out the listing on this one. Not only has the bidding been strong, but at the time of writing, there are 173 people watching that listing. Located in Sweet Grass, Montana, the Ford has been listed for sale here on eBay. Bidding has now pushed up to $2,500 in what is a No Reserve auction.

When it comes to solid old pickups, this Ford looks like it is a real beauty. The only rust that the owner identifies is some in the floors, the lower edges of the front fenders, and the running boards. All of these spots are easily repairable, with patches for the fenders now readily available. The running boards are quite serviceable as they are, and repairing and restoring them should be a pretty straightforward task. The notoriously rust-prone spots such as the lower doors and cab corners appear to be as clean as a whistle. The original Vermillion paint is now pretty faded, but one of the really notable things about the vehicle is just how straight it is for a workhorse. Dings and dents are quite limited in both size and number, and what there are should be pretty easy to address. One area that will require attention is the glass, because much of this is badly cracked, and it will require replacement.

Occupying the engine bay of the Ford is a 239ci V8, producing 100hp. The transmission is a manual unit, but it isn’t clear whether it is a 3 or a 4-speed. If the Pickup was built in early 1950 then it could be either, because it was in the second half of 1950 that the shifter for the 3-speed was moved from the floor to the column. That means that if this vehicle is a late 1950 model, then it would definitely be a 4-speed. Otherwise, it would be a case of asking the owner about that one. A real positive comes in the form of news confirming that the 239 in this vehicle runs. It has had some new ignition components fitted, and the owner has had it running off an external fuel source. He says that the fuel system will need a full clean and a new fuel pump, but that not only does the engine run, but the transmission and clutch operate okay. The Pickup rolls and steers freely, but the brakes will require attention.


I like project vehicles that are willing to spring a pleasant surprise, and this is just such a vehicle. The interior is actually quite good, and the restoration looks like it might be really easy. Before I got too excited about pulling things apart, I would be very inclined to spend some time with some quality polish on the interior’s painted surfaces. They seem to be in pretty decent condition, and I think that a little polish and elbow grease could produce some really positive results. The seat will require a new cover, while the wheel is pretty badly cracked, and should probably be replaced. The owner identifies the radio delete plate as being broken, and if the next owner isn’t keen on the idea of fitting a radio, reproduction plates can easily be found for around the $30 mark. All up, it looks like reviving the interior of the Pickup might take more physical effort than cash, which is never a bad thing when tackling a restoration.

As I said previously, this 1950 Ford Pickup is a vehicle with a lot of potential as a project. The big question would be exactly what path the next owner might choose to take. Me? I’d probably be inclined to restore it to its former glory, but that’s only one opinion. If you bought it, what would you do?

More: F1 / Ford / Pickup
 

TrueBlue02058

Post King
Aussie Super Sedan! 2010 Holden Caprice

Adam Clarke
Adam Clarke


When the doors of the Holden plant closed in October of 2017, it marked the end of the manufacture of Australian designed and developed cars that dated back to 1948. It also marked the end of the V8-engined Holden, a line that has produced some very impressive and desirable motor vehicles over the years. With a strong band of enthusiasts in the motoring community, these types of cars will always remain highly coveted. This 2010 Holden Caprice is a perfect example of a car that has the potential to increase in value in the coming years. We wouldn’t normally feature something this new, but this is no ordinary Caprice because as you will see, it is a car that really is an iron fist wrapped in a velvet glove that is sure to go up in value as it becomes a modern classic. It is located in Launceston, Tasmania, Australia, with the owner setting the price at $45,000 OBO. You can use the contact form at the bottom of this article to make inquiries about this hot Holden.

The Caprice comes finished in Alto Grey, and the paint across the entire car is original. This is a vehicle that has been well cared for, and it has always been garage-kept by its current owner. I have had the opportunity to inspect this car personally, and its presentation is close to flawless. There are only a very minimal number of minute stone-chips in the paint, which has a great depth of shine to it. A close inspection will reveal that this is a car that is completely rust-free. The glass is all perfect, with no chips or scratches. The external trim and chrome is in impressive condition and provides a nice contrast to the Grey paint. While the Caprice comes as a fully-loaded luxury car, the addition of a set of new 18″ Chip Foose Legend wheels give some indication that this isn’t your average luxury car. Those wheels are quite a rare addition to any Australian car, but if they aren’t to the new owner’s personal taste, then the original wheels and tires are included in the sale. Also included is a custom-made locking car cover, which will afford the Caprice additional protection when it is parked in the next owner’s garage.

Standard fitment in the 2010 Caprice was the 6.0-liter L98 V8, producing 362hp. This power was then sent to the rear wheels via a GM 6L80E 6-speed automatic transmission. As I said, this is a car with an iron fist, because it has received quite a few mechanical upgrades, which were funded by the current owner as a “money is no object” exercise. For Australian performance car enthusiasts, the name Ron Harrop is synonymous with meticulous engineering of performance components for both road and race. This V8 reaps the benefits of this knowledge, as it now wears a Harrop Engineering supercharger. In addition, the engine has been fitted with a custom-grind camshaft, high-capacity injectors, a Z/1 fuel pump upgrade, ceramic-coated exhaust headers, and a powder-coated 3″ stainless steel exhaust with polished mufflers. The result of all of this work is that the engine no longer produces 362hp, but is now in excess of 600hp. To cope with the increased performance, there is a 3,000rpm high-stall torque converter, and the ABS brakes have been upgraded with RDA discs all round, fitted with ceramic pads. However, it really is a velvet glove as well. I have had the opportunity to travel in this car, and in normal city commuter traffic, it drives quite smoothly, with only a deeper exhaust note giving any indication that the engine isn’t standard. When you bury the right foot, the Caprice certainly grabs your attention. The performance that it provides should be enough to satisfy any performance enthusiast.


When you open the door of the Caprice, the first thing that you notice is the aftermarket sheepskin seat covers. The owner is fastidious about the care of his car, and those sheepskins are there to offer protection to the spotless leather-upholstered seats. The rest of the interior presents beautifully, and once you slide inside the car, there are no indications of the beast that is at your disposal. What you find is life in the lap of luxury. The largely grey interior upholstery is highlighted by a number of brushed aluminum trim pieces on the doors, dash, and console. The leather front seats feature 8-way electrical adjustment, while the Caprice also comes with climate-control air conditioning, power windows, power mirrors, keyless entry, cruise control, reversing sensors, seven airbags, a leather-wrapped wheel adjustable for tilt and reach, and a premium Bose entertainment system.

Of course, it would be wrong to exclude the rear-seat passengers from the fun, so they also receive the leather upholstery and aluminum trim. In addition, tri-zone air conditioning will keep them comfortable, while twin LCD screens and a separate DVD player should help to keep them amused on long journeys. The Caprice is built on the same basic platform as the Holden Commodore, which is a car that was sold as the Chevrolet SS in the US between 2013 and 2017. However, the wheelbase of the Commodore was stretched to create this larger car, and all of that additional length provides rear-seat passengers with greatly improved legroom.

In the medium to long term, there is little doubt that values on the later V8-engined Holdens are going to follow the trend of earlier examples such as the Monaro and Torana, and they will increase. If past history is any indication, then these increases will be quite significant over time. The simple and sad fact is that cars like this Caprice mark the end of an era in Australian motoring history, and we will never see their type again. That could potentially make this a car that in the short term will put an enormous smile on the next owner’s face while providing a solid long term investment.
 

TrueBlue02058

Post King

Hemi Cobra Kit Car!!!

Jeff Lavery
Jeff Lavery


The seller of this AC Cobra replica had a very specific goal when he set out to build the car to his specifications: assemble the first-ever Hemi-powered Cobra. Although the project has stalled and is now for sale, an impressive amount of custom work and parts-sourcing has been done for the next owner to pick up where he left off and bring it across the finish line. Find it here on craigslist in New York’s Hudson Valley region as a running, driving project for $25,000.

The Cobra rides on a C4 Corvette suspension and rear end, providing it with four-wheel independent suspension and an easily-serviced chassis that features control arms, axle shafts, and brakes all lifted from your bread-and-butter Corvette. This should make parts-sourcing and future upgrades a breeze, not to mention give this kit car a very compliant ride and respectable handling. The seller notes the frame is rectangular with welded seams, and extremely robust.

The 5.7L Hemi engine was removed from a 2004 Dodge Ram pickup with claimed mileage of less than 15,000. The engine was then upgraded with an aluminum intake manifold and four-barrel Holley carburetor. The seller notes that this engine does not have a stock EGR as part of its emissions system, which made the adaptation to the chassis fairly painless. The engine is paired to a new (in 2012) Chrysler 904 / 3-speed automatic built by TCI with torque converter.


Not much is said about the rest of the chassis, but there’s obviously still some wiring and interior finishing left to do. The seller notes the Cobra is running and driving at the moment, making good power but in need of a finished exhaust. The body also will need further attention and to be prepped for paint. Still, for a running, driving example with a lot of the heavy lifting done, this seems like a potentially fun project to finish – but if you’re a die-hard Cobra fan, could you abide the Chrysler-sourced drivertrain?

More: Cobra / Dodge
 

TrueBlue02058

Post King
Garaged 38 Years! 1951 Ford F1 Pickup

Montana Danford
Montana Danford


This 1951 Ford F1 was already 30 years old when it was stored in a garage for the next 38. It is now for sale and can be found here on Craigslist with an asking price of $7,000. Located in Rochester, New York, it was last registered in 1981 and is ready to hit the road again. It has a clear title and looks pretty handsome with the two-tone brown paint. Let’s take a closer look.


The interior looks pretty typical of a truck of this era. I love the two round gauge clusters on these trucks. The transmission is a column-shift manual and it looks like the interior hasn’t been poked and prodded much. A good cleaning and it should be ready to enjoy.


The engine is a straight-six and like the interior, it appears to be fairly stock. These trucks are so simple to work on, original examples are good candidates for an inexperienced restorer. The ad says this truck hasn’t run in nearly forty years. Hopefully, it turns over and with a little fresh fuel and spark it will start up.

You’ll notice lights on the top of the front fenders and this is usually indicative of a work truck, the ad confirms this. The ad also states that it has rust in the “typical places.” I’m not sure exactly what “typical rust” is, but I’m guessing frame, rockers, fenders, etc. You’ll also notice this box on the side of the truck. It may just be a verticle toolbox? I’ve never seen an accessory quite like this one before. If you know this was a factory or dealer-installed option, leave us a comment.

More: Ford F1
 

TrueBlue02058

Post King
Garaged 38 Years! 1951 Ford F1 Pickup

Montana Danford
Montana Danford


This 1951 Ford F1 was already 30 years old when it was stored in a garage for the next 38. It is now for sale and can be found here on Craigslist with an asking price of $7,000. Located in Rochester, New York, it was last registered in 1981 and is ready to hit the road again. It has a clear title and looks pretty handsome with the two-tone brown paint. Let’s take a closer look.


The interior looks pretty typical of a truck of this era. I love the two round gauge clusters on these trucks. The transmission is a column-shift manual and it looks like the interior hasn’t been poked and prodded much. A good cleaning and it should be ready to enjoy.


The engine is a straight-six and like the interior, it appears to be fairly stock. These trucks are so simple to work on, original examples are good candidates for an inexperienced restorer. The ad says this truck hasn’t run in nearly forty years. Hopefully, it turns over and with a little fresh fuel and spark it will start up.

You’ll notice lights on the top of the front fenders and this is usually indicative of a work truck, the ad confirms this. The ad also states that it has rust in the “typical places.” I’m not sure exactly what “typical rust” is, but I’m guessing frame, rockers, fenders, etc. You’ll also notice this box on the side of the truck. It may just be a verticle toolbox? I’ve never seen an accessory quite like this one before. If you know this was a factory or dealer-installed option, leave us a comment.

More: Ford F1
 
Top